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Search Results for "codling moth"

Combining Leafroller and Codling Moth Control Tactics

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
The period of time when overwintering leafroller (LR) larvae are most susceptible to the new insecticides overlaps with the beginning of the codling moth (CM) egg laying period. Some new insecticides will kill overwintering leafroller larvae as well as codling moth eggs that are laid on top of the insecticide residues.

Monitoring Adult Codling Moth

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Adult codling moth (CM) are monitored with traps baited with either CM pheromones or a mixture of pheromones and an attractant (Combo D/A lure). Pheromone traps should be placed in the upper 1/3 of the tree canopy before first apple blossoms open or by 100 DD since January 1 whichever comes first. If you are not using mating disruption...

New CM Control Strategies

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
A new method of controlling codling moth has been developed at WSU where timing of the sprays is altered to take advantage of the slow start of egg laying.

Leafroller and Codling Moth Movement During the Season

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Movement of codling moth and leafrollers into your orchard can be the start of serious damage. Both CM and leafrollers can easily fly 5-7 miles in a single night and their reproduction is as high as those that do not fly. Although 5-7 mile flights are common, the likelihood of the moths coming to your orchard in high numbers is directly related to wind speed, distance from the source, and the environment in between the source and your orchard.

Monitoring Codling Moth Damage

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Monitoring codling moth at the end of each generation gives a good indication of the success of your management program and where in the orchard damage occurs. The sampling protocol for the Taiwan protocol can give you good accuracy and is simple to implement. Banding trees can serve as monitoring and control technique.

Bin Piles Are a Source of CM Off the Normal Model

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Bin piles placed in the orchard are often a source of codling moth. Larvae spin up in the bins in the fall and emerge when the bins are placed in the field. Because the bins in the center of a pile are insulated from temperature changes, adults emerge from bins at different times than predicted by the model.

Predicting Third Generation of CM

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Predicting the extent of the third generation of codling moth (CM) is based on a statistical relationship of the degree-days historically found on 1 August and at the end of the season on 1 November. We update this prediction roughly every 10 days after 15 August because the DD prediction for 1 November gets more accurate as we get closer.

Taiwan Protocol and Export Required Sampling

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Those expecting to export apples to Taiwan need to have their training updated every two years and use the sampling protocols negotiated with Taiwan. Three Orchard and Field Bin Sampling Protocol training sessions are scheduled for August.

How Does Codling Moth Mating Disruption Work?

Friday February 19, 2016 2:38pm
Mating disruption dispensers work by releasing synthetic pheromone which prevents or delays males from finding females, thus reducing the reproductive rate of the population. Now is the time to decide which dispensers to place in the orchard so you have enough time for ordering and to organize your work force.

Apply Mating Disruption Dispensers Before First Moths Fly

Friday February 19, 2016 2:38pm
Mating disruption dispensers work by releasing synthetic pheromone which prevents or delays males from finding and mating with females. Therefore, dispensers need to be placed in your orchard before the first moths fly and mate. First moth flight (= biofix) occurs at around 175 DD. We recommend to place pheromone traps before first apple blossoms open or by 100 DD whichever comes first.
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