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Bt Applications for Leafrollers

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a bacterium that must be eaten by lepidopteran larvae (caterpillars) to be effective. Bt is a great material for leafroller control because it is specific and has little effect on natural enemies. However, it must be applied 2-3 times to be effective when leafroller populations are high. Experience has also shown that in the spring, the high temperatures need to be above 65°F for 3 or more days so that larvae have a chance to feed on it before sunlight breaks it down. DAS provides forecast temperatures for all stations in the "Weather Forecast" and in the "Show Data Grid" table so that you can decide whether or not to use Bt or other recommended chemicals.

Preserving Biocontrol Agents

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Natural enemies (NE) are crucial to the long-term stability of management programs. Pesticides need to be chosen not only on the basis of efficacy against the pests, but also by minimizing their effect on natural enemies. DAS provides both the effects on pests and on the key natural enemies.

Leafroller and Codling Moth Movement During the Season

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
Movement of codling moth and leafrollers into your orchard can be the start of serious damage. Both CM and leafrollers can easily fly 5-7 miles in a single night and their reproduction is as high as those that do not fly. Although 5-7 mile flights are common, the likelihood of the moths coming to your orchard in high numbers is directly related to wind speed, distance from the source, and the environment in between the source and your orchard.

Spider Mite Control During the Summer

Monday May 16, 2016 1:30pm
There are currently lots of options to control spider mites in orchards. However, preventing outbreaks by avoiding pesticides toxic to predatory mites and their alternative prey is always first choice. If uncontrolled, spider mites can go through a single generation in 7-10 days during summer and increase their numbers exponentially. Monitoring helps to follow spider mite population growth and to intervene when necessary.
Decision Aid System v. 6.3.35.2 (DAS) - Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center
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